Bicycle storage

 
Protection against wind and weather.
Bicycle storage

Are you sick of carrying your bike down to the cellar? This do-it-yourself bikeport provides a remedy – and it looks good too!

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Introduction

Difficulty level

Costs

Time required

Take a day to do yourself and your bikes a favour with this bikeport.

The following construction guide applies to solid spruce wood. Simply have the required posts, joists and roof boards (see material list) cut to size at the DIY store or by your carpenter. If you use other materials or material with a different thickness, adapt the parts list accordingly.

You will find a detailed material list and the construction drawing under the link entitled “Downloads for the project”.

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Required power tools:

Other accessories:

  • Sanding paper, grit of 100–240
  • Wood drill bit set
  • Masonry drill bit set
  • Hammer

Required materials:

  • Solid spruce wood (for parts, see material list)
  • 6 x 140 mm flat head screws
  • 6 x 140 mm flat head screws with 12-mm wall plugs
  • 6 x 120 mm flat head screws
  • 6 x 50 mm flat head screws
  • 4 x 50 mm flat head screws
  • 4 x 35 mm panheads
  • Outdoor wood varnish – teak-coloured
  • If necessary, impregnating primer (observe the varnish manufacturer’s specifications)

Show detailed material list

Item

pcs

Designation

Length

Width

Thickness

Material

0

3

Post

1697 mm

70 mm

95 mm

FIRAHM 95 – Solid spruce wood

1

1

Transverse joist

1930 mm

70 mm

95 mm

FIRAHM 95 – Solid spruce wood

2

1

Wall support

2000 mm

70 mm

95 mm

FIRAHM 95 – Solid spruce wood

3

3

Rafter

1920 mm

70 mm

95 mm

FIRAHM 95 – Solid spruce wood

4

19

Facing

2000 mm

45 mm

19 mm

FILATT 19 – Solid spruce wood

5

12

Roof boards

2600 mm

195 mm

18 mm

FIRAHM 80 – Solid spruce wood

6

3

Joist hanger

0 mm

0 mm

31 mm

KO S31

7

2

Bracing

1365 mm

30 mm

3 mm

WI AL 6 – Bulk length, with one-sided mitre of 45°

8

3

Steel bracket

0 mm

0 mm

2 mm

WI ZK 2 – Bracket for rafter fixing

9

2

Varnish

0 mm

0 mm

1 mm

VARNISH 30

10

6

140 mm

Flat head screws

11

6

140 mm

Flat head screws with 12-mm wall plugs

12

6

120 mm

Flat head screws

13

6

50 mm

Flat head screws

14

4

50 mm

Flat head screws

15

4

35 mm

Panheads

1

Cutting the panels to size

Tip: Have the pieces of wood cut to their final length at the DIY store or by a carpenter.

2

Sanding and coating the surfaces

 
Bicycle storage

First sand all wood parts with the sander. Begin coarse with a 100 grit, then with a fine 120 grit. When doing so, also chamfer all edges, i.e. sand a 45° bevel.

After sanding the wood, apply the varnish with the paintbrush (if necessary, you should apply an impregnating primer prior to the varnish. Please also observe the varnish manufacturer’s instructions on this).

Once they are dry, turn the wood parts over and varnish the other sides.

This process has to be repeated 2 or 3 times. For a nicer surface, you can sand with a fine 240 grit between applying coats (i.e. lightly sand at reduced speed).

3

Making a vertical wall with the facings and screwing on the joist hangers

 
Bicycle storage Bicycle storage

Lay the posts and the joists on the floor and align them as shown in the drawing. Screw the parts together over the joists (6x120). The posts have to have a large cross-section, so you do not necessarily have to pre-drill them.

Once the three posts and the joist have been screwed together, the next step is to fit the facings (panhead 4x35). The distance between the facings is each equal to the width of a facing. You can therefore use these as spacers during assembly.

When doing so, be sure not to tighten the screws too tight. If this happens, the wood will break on the surface around the screw head, and water will be able to penetrate into the unvarnished inside of the wood.

Now screw the steel brackets on the top for rafters, which will be fitted later (panhead 4x35, one steel bracket per rafter).

Then screw the joist hangers (6x50 mm) onto each of the post bottoms.

4

Mounting the support for the roof

 
Bicycle storage Bicycle storage

The support is fitted to the façade wall using the 6x140 mm screws and the 12-mm wall plugs (length 60 mm). (If your façade is insulated, the screws have to be longer according to the insulation thickness. Please check your structural conditions in advance).

Pre-drill the support with 7 mm diameter and position it on the façade as shown in the drawing. Now use a screw and the hammer to transfer the holes of the support onto the façade. This will score the holes that have to be drilled in the façade.

Then use the impact drill and the 12 mm diameter masonry drill bit to drill the scored holes, knock in the wall plugs and fit the support using the screws.

5

Fitting the rafters to the support and to the vertical partition wall

 
Bicycle storage Bicycle storage

First position the partition wall as shown in the drawing. To make sure that it does not tip over, secure it with two pieces of scrap wood.

Now put the first rafter in position and connect it to the steel brackets already fitted to the partition wall (4 x 35 mm panheads). On the façade side, you then screw the joist to the support (6 x 140 mm flat head screws, don’t forget to pre-drill).

Now repeat the same with the other two rafters.

Then dismantle the scrap wood used as tilt protection.

6

Roofing

The roofing is done from the bottom up. To do so, lay the first roof board in position as shown in the drawing and screw it using the 4 x 50 mm flat head screws. Fit the screws so that they are covered by the next roof board.

To make sure that the screws are completely countersunk, you have to use the countersink on the pre-drilled holes prior to inserting the screws (at least one screw per rafter, and again don’t forget to pre-drill).

Then work your way upwards, roof board by roof board.

The last roof board is visibly screwed down at the front. Use the panhead screws for this, so that the surface is not damaged.

7

Fitting the aluminium brackets for the static bracing

To ensure that the bikeport is statically braced, screw the aluminium brackets on the inside of the vertical wall.

Cut these to length as shown in the drawing using the hacksaw and saw each one with a 45° mitre on one side.

Then drill two holes at each end with a diameter of 5 mm using the twist drill bit and the cordless screwdriver, and screw the aluminium brackets tight to the posts using the panhead screws as shown in the drawing.

8

Done

 
Bicycle storage

The bikeport is now complete. Have fun with it!


Legal note

Bosch does not accept any responsibility for the instructions stored here. Bosch would also like to point out that you follow these instructions at your own risk. For your own safety, please take all the necessary precautions.


 

Service Hotline

For questions on our After Sales Service:

:+61 1300 307 044

Monday - Friday: 8:30 - 17:00


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